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Leather vs Textile abrasion tests

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calgary56:
September 1988 issue of Cycle magazine did a comparison. They put a 75 pound sandbag in a milk crate, hooked to an assembly off the back of a pick-up. Test sample bags, made from different materials, filled with chalk was stitched to the bottom, when they got the tuck up to 50 mph, they lowered the samples to contact the pavement, to simulate a slide (not a tumble) here are the results, when the sample material wore through, the chalk line was visible, indicating the point at which the rider would be down to skin.

Leather competition weight, 3 oz/sq ft .... 86 feet
Kevlar 29 Aramid fiibre, Style 713 .... 22 ft 1 in
Cordra nylon, type 440 .... 18 ft 3 in
2 year old 100% cotton denim jeans .... 4 ft 5 in
Leather, fashion weight, 1.75 oz/sq ft .... 4 ft 4 in
Leather, fashion weight nude finish .... 4 ft 3 in
Senior ballistic nylon .... 3 ft 10 in
New 100% cotton denim jeans .... 3 ft 10 in

This is dated, and there may well be newer materials out there, but riding leathers are still your best bet

Breeze:
I have read that data before (I doubt is was back in 1988).  I have always wondered how/why older jeans lasted better than new. New ones seem so much heavier.

calgary56:
The new jean fibres are relatively coarse, and the aggregate in the asphalt hooks onto them easier, old jeans are smooth, not quite threadbare, but the aggregate doesn't catch them quite as easily, .... but in the big scheme of things, 4' 5" vs 3' 10" sliding on yer a$$ at 50 mph you'd be hard pressed to notice the 7 inch difference, both would land you in a world-of-hurt

strokerjlk:

--- Quote from: calgary56 on Wednesday, October 24, 2012. 10:52:03 AM. ---September 1988 issue of Cycle magazine did a comparison. They put a 75 pound sandbag in a milk crate, hooked to an assembly off the back of a pick-up. Test sample bags, made from different materials, filled with chalk was stitched to the bottom, when they got the tuck up to 50 mph, they lowered the samples to contact the pavement, to simulate a slide (not a tumble) here are the results, when the sample material wore through, the chalk line was visible, indicating the point at which the rider would be down to skin.

Leather competition weight, 3 oz/sq ft .... 86 feet
Kevlar 29 Aramid fiibre, Style 713 .... 22 ft 1 in
Cordra nylon, type 440 .... 18 ft 3 in
2 year old 100% cotton denim jeans .... 4 ft 5 in
Leather, fashion weight, 1.75 oz/sq ft .... 4 ft 4 in
Leather, fashion weight nude finish .... 4 ft 3 in
Senior ballistic nylon .... 3 ft 10 in
New 100% cotton denim jeans .... 3 ft 10 in

This is dated, and there may well be newer materials out there, but riding leathers are still your best bet

--- End quote ---
:beer:
Good info right there

Templar2:
Textile comes with pads at the contact points, when friction developes those pads turn to a hard plastic like material and that is what offers some slide protection.  I like textile for it's versatility and comfort, but leather (now some of it comes armored as well) is hard to beat in a slide.  Regardless, both are better than a tee shirt and jeans! (won't touch the helmet prefference here)

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