Author Topic: 1980 Flt  (Read 3113 times)

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Offline mgone

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1980 Flt
« on: Monday, August 01, 2011. 07:22:15 AM. »
Hi
I fairly new to Harley Davidson and am looking at a 1980 FLT with very low miles (5000mi) and is completely original. Can anyone give me the pros and cons  on this bike and in particular what a fair price would be?

Offline easyricer

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #1 on: Monday, August 01, 2011. 12:59:02 PM. »
An 80 FLT is probably in the $10,000 range in immaculate (show room) condition and drops from there. All original (original pipes, handle bars, seat, paint, ect) around $8500. Working ,running, daily rider, with matching numbers around $6500. Enough parts to call a motorcycle about $2500.
 These are just a few numbers off the top of my head, based on what todays market is doing. 
 In actuality, it's worth what you are willing to pay.
 Personally I'd be more scared of an extreme low miles old bike than a daily rider with 50k+ on the clock. Low miles means it sat for a very long time, allowing seals and gaskets to dry out, the motor to wet sump and tires to rot. Sitting that long will also allow the grease to cake, gas to dry up and crystallize, cylinders to rust and brakes to seize. The more work it needs to get back running the less it'll be worth on the market. I'd have a hard time believing a 31 year old bike with only 5000miles will not need a mess of work unless it sat inside someones livingroom, drained and cleaned regularly.
EASY
Just ride the damned thing!

Offline mgone

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #2 on: Monday, August 01, 2011. 06:54:09 PM. »
Thanks for the input, that  gives me a lot to think about. One additional question though, what do you mean by the term "wet sump"?


Offline 76shuvlinoff

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #3 on: Monday, August 01, 2011. 07:11:16 PM. »
sumping
 Over time the oil drains down from the tank past the check valve and fills the engine case. Check the oil level in the tank, if it's not there it went somewhere.
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Offline vern

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #4 on: Monday, August 01, 2011. 07:56:08 PM. »
I bought a 82 FLT last year on ebay for $4450.00 21,000 miles, all original, sort of. I have been riding it steady since I got it, I think my barn find was a good one, but they are all different and what has been said about the rust and seals and sumping is all true. So if your into tinkering, jump right in!

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Offline autoworker

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday, August 03, 2011. 05:07:23 PM. »
Do you like to do maintenance on mechanical stuff?

The 1980 FLT is a good bike in the right hands.

I bought one a little over 2 yrs. ago and while most everything worked it needed a good going through.It was well used and served previous owners well.I'm sure it treated them better than they treated it.

They are very reliable bikes and will reward an owner that keeps up on maintenance.The enclosed chain works well if it is still intact.The chain runs and runs without needing adjustment.They will leave a small mark regardless of how well they are sealed.

If you own one,use it,and maintain it,you will have a connection with it and trust in it will continue grow.They cruise quite nicely and you can comfortably put some miles behind you on one.

If you don't like to wrench and want to just ride it's probably best to go with a newer model bike.

That's about the best description and advice I can give you.

Let us know what you decide.
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Offline Old Crow

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #6 on: Thursday, August 04, 2011. 02:12:17 AM. »
I've had my '82 FLT for about 8 years and I couldn't have said it any better than Autoworker.
As my ol' daddy used to say,"It's always something", but I love that bike.
Anything worth shooting, is worth shooting twice.

Offline mgone

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday, August 09, 2011. 07:03:37 AM. »
Well I just jumped in and bought it. Still has the original tires which are being changed out right away. I love to tinker and have been wrenching on old bikes all my life, just never a Harley. The engine sounds great with no leaks of any sort. I'm working from front to back changing fluids and checking for anything that might be out of adjustment. Thanks for your input, I'll keep you posted on my progress.

Offline motorplex88

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday, August 09, 2011. 07:14:44 AM. »
Congrats !  Nothing complicated about shovels if ya don't want it to be. Just nuts and bolts. Grab ya a shop manual and let the tinkering begin. I find it enjoyable myself. Hope you enjoy yours.

Offline autoworker

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday, August 09, 2011. 07:56:01 AM. »
Well I just jumped in and bought it. Still has the original tires which are being changed out right away.
Congratulations.

!WARNING!
Don't take the enclosed chain housing apart when removing the rear wheel.There is a rubber plug on the side of the housing to access the sprocket hub to wheel bolts.I believe there are 5 of them.They are socket head cap screws.Unbolt those bolts before doing anything else.Then remove the axle and leave the sprocket assy.and chain enclosure in place.You will have to loosen a bolt or two to allow the sheetmetal brackets to slide on the swingarm when adjusting the chain.Make sure you get the bike high enough off the ground when removing the rear wheel.

There are NOS repair and parts manuals available on ebay.I highly recommend you get both.

Enjoy!
It must be true,I read it on the internet.

Offline Old Crow

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday, August 09, 2011. 06:44:18 PM. »
Where the heck were you when I bought my '82?    :banghead:

Took me almost 4 hours to change the tire the first time.  Bought a 3" long 3/8" hex bit off the Snap-on truck for those sprocket bolts.  Makes 'em easy to get to down inside the gearcase.  Put a piece of fuel line over the bit to protect the threads on the gearcase.
Got my time down to about 2 hours now, but that's if the stars align just right.
Anything worth shooting, is worth shooting twice.

Offline easyricer

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday, August 10, 2011. 05:50:45 AM. »
LMAO Took 4 hrs the first time I did one. We called it an education! Good news about that experience, we resealed everything and it hasn't dripped yet! Since we were in there anyhow, we replaced all the gaskets, new chain,new bearings and everything got cleaned. That was bout 4 years ago on a buddies 80-80 FLT. (amazingly we were able to get the seals and all from HD)
EASY
Just ride the damned thing!

Offline Old Crow

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Re: 1980 Flt
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday, August 10, 2011. 07:11:22 PM. »
Uh, Easy?  You're supposed to put oil in it after you put it back together.  :smiled:  That's why it doesn't leak.

I'm running an o-ring chain and the only oil in the chaincase comes from the trans main seal.  I spray some chain lube on the chain through that rubber plug on the top of the chaincase every couple of months or so.  The bike leaves a spot about the size of a quarter after a 250 mile ride. 
I don't beat the *total*dog crap outa this bike, but she's a 92" stroker and I like to hear her sing.  I've had the bike like 7 years and haven't moved the chain adjusters back more than 1/2" in that time and every time I take the whole thing apart the chain is as clean as if I just put it on there.
Anything worth shooting, is worth shooting twice.