Author Topic: emergency drive belt  (Read 3480 times)

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Offline 03cvo

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emergency drive belt
« on: Thursday, January 20, 2011. 01:52:04 PM. »
need to add an emergency drive belt into my tool kit. ( ya know you never need one if you have one...right) anyway, on the HD genuine motor accessories site they list only one for a bagger / touring. it gives a range of years from "97 thru 06". part #40112-97. anyone know if this will fit an 07 flhr.

http://www.harley-davidson.com/gma/gma_product.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524441847159&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302290831&ASSORTMENT%3C%3East_id=2534374302290831&bmUID=1295559385546&bmLocale=en_US

Also does anyone make an aftermarket em belt kit?

thanks in advance....

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #1 on: Thursday, January 20, 2011. 04:49:09 PM. »
I can't answer your model year question other than to say, I think the belt width changed in '07.
After I broke two belts, I gave some thought to getting one of those emergency belts. Then I started thinking about how difficult it would be to get the belt around the transmission pulley and working with all those small bolts on the side of the road with the bike on the jiffy stand and the side of the bike your working on only a few inches off the ground and my arthritic knee and I decided it'd be much more comfortable calling a tow truck and replacing the belt on the table lift in my garage. :wink:
Listen to the jingle the rumble and the roar.

Offline Dogmeat

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #2 on: Saturday, January 22, 2011. 05:12:46 AM. »
What Truck said....besides the concern of it gettin' bent on too small of a radius  whilst bein' stored.....and that's NOT a good thing!
Personally, I'd do EGGZAKLY what Truck said....not worry 'bout it....call a tow truck/friend....
The Disgusting But Proud Slutpup!

Offline Ridetard

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #3 on: Saturday, January 22, 2011. 06:02:09 AM. »
The harley drive belt is designed to last 100,000 miles.  If you had one brake before that, bad luck.  If you replace a second one, best start looking for your problem.

Offline 03cvo

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #4 on: Sunday, January 23, 2011. 09:44:55 AM. »
have only had one break and it was close to home. fortunately.

i do, however, end up on some lonely (sometimes gravel) roads. and according to "Murphy 101" the belt would pick up a stone and break when on one of these roads way up nowhere with no cell service. i am guessing you guys would try to install a emergency belt when and where it breaks other than leaving your fully loaded ride on the side of the road while you hiked the several miles to phone service. "if" a belt was available.

and if i had one and came across you with a broken belt on the road i would "lend" it to you as well.    ;0)

ya pays your money and you take your chances....

Offline Back Road Mike

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday, January 25, 2011. 07:20:03 AM. »
have only had one break and it was close to home. fortunately.

i do, however, end up on some lonely (sometimes gravel) roads. and according to "Murphy 101" the belt would pick up a stone and break when on one of these roads way up nowhere with no cell service. i am guessing you guys would try to install a emergency belt when and where it breaks other than leaving your fully loaded ride on the side of the road while you hiked the several miles to phone service. "if" a belt was available.

and if i had one and came across you with a broken belt on the road i would "lend" it to you as well.    ;0)

ya pays your money and you take your chances....

I replaced my first belt at 65k while installing the 103. It was showing a little wear, but could have lasted longer.  Figured while apart, might as well.

At 115K I broke the second belt 90 miles from home.  I was fortunate that a neighbor came out with a trailer and brought us home. The local dealer didn't have a belt in stock and the service department wasn't open Sundays.   While purchasing replacement gaskets/seals for the inner primary at my favorite dealer, a well respected parts manager said they see lots of replacements after 60k.. 


Offline moscooter

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday, January 25, 2011. 09:46:16 AM. »
 :pop:
"While purchasing replacement gaskets/seals for the inner primary at my favorite dealer, a well respected parts manager said they see lots of replacements after 60k.. "

Maybe he didn't explain why.........but after that many miles,  the pulleys need to be replaced at the same time,  not just a new belt running on (old/worn) pulleys. :potstir:

Offline chopper

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday, January 26, 2011. 04:17:54 AM. »
one word...................  chain
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" Richard Feynman

Offline moscooter

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #8 on: Wednesday, January 26, 2011. 05:43:20 AM. »
 :potstir:

Chain rhymes with "pain".  Been there,  done that.  I'm gonna guess that the o-ring chains in use today make things a lot easier but beyond that, chains can also break and sprockets too also get "hooked" and wear out.  Belts are quieter,  cleaner and normally a lot less of a hassle that a chain from my past experiences.

Offline MMOCGuy

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday, January 26, 2011. 09:00:47 AM. »
"I'm gonna guess that the o-ring chains in use today make things a lot easier but beyond that, chains can also break and sprockets too also get "hooked" and wear out.  Belts are quieter,  cleaner and normally a lot less of a hassle that a chain from my past experiences."

All true however, the gist of the post is how to repair a broken belt on the road. For that purpose, a chain is better because it is easy to repair on the side of the road. Repair parts are easy to carry with you and don't take up any room in a saddlebag or tool kit.

With all of that said, probably the best advice to check the belt regularly for wear and/or indications of problems and replace if anything is curoius. I would check it everytime I clean or service the bike. As was posted by moscooter, when replacing the belt at higher mileages, the pulleys also need to be replaced to insure trouble freeperformance from the belt.

Hope this helps.

NormS.

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday, January 26, 2011. 01:40:12 PM. »
Belts don't show signs that they are going to break, they just pull apart whenever they want to.
You should inspect your tires and belt often. I've found stones imbedded in my belt but none were on the edge of the belt so I remove them and kept on truckin.
Both belts that broke for me showed no damage at the breaking piont.
My 2001 Ultra is on it's fourth belt now at 75,748 miles.
First belt had a stone hole in it and I had the dealer replace it and my comprehensive insurance paid for it. I don't remember the mileage.
Second belt broke at 34,7xx miles while on a group ride pulling away from a traffic light while riding two up. It was replaced by an indi shop with a BDL belt.
Third belt broke at 44,365 miles. That was probably pilot error because I stalled the motor and tried bump start it.
I replaced both pulleys and the belt myself using a Screaming Eagle/sidecar belt, and that belt has a hole in for many miles now.
Listen to the jingle the rumble and the roar.

Offline chopper

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday, January 26, 2011. 02:07:26 PM. »
I have said for a long time now there's something drastically wrong when a $20,000  touring rig can get totally disabled with a little piece of gravel..  Left stranded by the roadside, needing a tow to a dealer, and 600-700 dollars to repair.

criminal negligence to my way of thinking. 
 
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" Richard Feynman

Offline sporty88

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #12 on: Thursday, January 27, 2011. 03:59:35 PM. »
I agree with Truck,laying on the the ground doing anything but taking an afternoon rest stop nap doesnt work for me either!Had enough of that back in the day. :soda:

Offline OKLARACIN

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #13 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 11:25:41 AM. »
yea well i carry one in my saddle bags and so do most of my customers. i ride a lot in way out of the way places. i don't mind laying on the ground to put one on. what if u are some where ur cell doesn't work? do u really want to just sit and wait? not me i will be back on the road in bout 30 minutes. one of the first things u need to put in your tool kit! :smiled:

Offline Ultrashovel

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #14 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 01:06:15 PM. »
It's a good idea to stay off of gravel roads. When you ride in such areas, there is a likelihood of picking up a stone.

Kept on the paved roads, a belt and pulleys will do 100K miles easily.

Offline fatboy

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #15 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 01:28:16 PM. »
Whose,s emer. belt do you use and how much?

Offline OKLARACIN

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #16 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 02:44:08 PM. »
i use the hd belt for my fltri. it retails for 105.00 there are others out there butt on stuff like this i stay with the factory stuff. not sure if they have a belt for every model. if they do have one i recomened taking on a trip or long ride. dont forget to have the tools to loosen axel. i have talk to people that have thru a belt and had to wait for hours for help. not to mention the expence for wrecker servis. and then if its towed to a dealership for repair??????

Offline Ultrashovel

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #17 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 05:53:41 PM. »
I was on a ride once with a friend who had a Dyna Low Rider. His rear belt let go and we coasted into a mall parking lot. He happened to have a Harley emergency belt with him so I helped him install it.

This was the type with very small, long socket head screws. One section of the belt was pointed like a long Vee and the other part had a matching Vee notch. It took about an hour to do the whole job and then we rode on like nothing happened.

The instructions say that it is only for temporary use and you must keep your speed way down. He went to the dealer a week or so later and had a new belt installed. So I can vouch for the fact that the emergency belts really do work. If you have one, it could get you going again.


Offline fatboy

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 09:19:12 PM. »
Looks like they don't make one for the Fatboy 2000 and up!

Offline chopper

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #19 on: Thursday, February 03, 2011. 06:41:12 AM. »
It's a good idea to stay off of gravel roads. When you ride in such areas, there is a likelihood of picking up a stone.

Kept on the paved roads, a belt and pulleys will do 100K miles easily.

  Again, can you imagine he outcry if ANY automaker released a top of the line vehicle and said "By the way, you mustn't drive on anything but a paved road or you may suffer a catastrophic failure!"

 Last year, my road was redone. Sprayed on hot tar and spread tiny gravel. Its still covered with loose stone. So I shouldn't be able to ride to and from HOME? A Harley own HAS to live on a paved road? What nonsense!

   Either properly shield the belt, or make it easily serviceable.
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" Richard Feynman

Offline Ultrashovel

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Re: emergency drive belt
« Reply #20 on: Thursday, February 03, 2011. 07:21:27 AM. »
It's a good idea to stay off of gravel roads. When you ride in such areas, there is a likelihood of picking up a stone.

Kept on the paved roads, a belt and pulleys will do 100K miles easily.

  Again, can you imagine he outcry if ANY automaker released a top of the line vehicle and said "By the way, you mustn't drive on anything but a paved road or you may suffer a catastrophic failure!"

 Last year, my road was redone. Sprayed on hot tar and spread tiny gravel. Its still covered with loose stone. So I shouldn't be able to ride to and from HOME? A Harley own HAS to live on a paved road? What nonsense!

   Either properly shield the belt, or make it easily serviceable.

The rear belt is a nice idea but it is relatively easily damaged as we all know. I've seen them keep running for many miles on friends' bikes with holes in them. As long as the damage is in the center of the belt, you are probably OK for a while.

I actually prefer a roller chain but changing over to one isn't worth the trouble.