Author Topic: Clutch  (Read 923 times)

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Offline glenf

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Clutch
« on: Monday, January 31, 2011. 06:26:25 AM. »
1986 Sportster 883 I cannot find a spring separator plate for the clutch. Can I place a friction discs in there and call it good? If not info on were to get one will be helpful. Thank you. Glen

Offline andyxlh

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  • '89 XLH '96 FLHR '73 125RC, Sydney Australia
Re: Clutch
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 02:43:31 PM. »
Hello mate
the spring plate part way through the clutch pack is there to reduce noise when the clutch is pulled. It can be replaced with a couple of drive plates and a fiction plate, as long as the clutch pack is still the correct thickness. If you have a stock clutch I think the addition of the three plates to replace the spring plate will probably be too thick, but if you have the thing apart you could try it - the pressure plate will need to fit back on with the retaining clip without over compressing the spring to do this. 'overcompressing' is a bit of a funny thing to define, i guess, but if you still have the compressor on the release plate and the spring compressed, you should not have to compress it much more to get the retaining clip back in would be a good guide.
I have had loads of different clutches in my modified bike over the years, including the Barnett 'extra plate' clutch without the spring plate, and by far the best clutch which has not slipped and lastd a long time I have found to be the OEM one with the spring plate.
the part number for the spring plate is:
36789-84
if you do a search or look on ebay you should find one.
cheers
Andy
Sydney
If you can't fix it with a hammer and a roll of Duck tape then you're in trouble

Offline andyxlh

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  • Country: au
  • '89 XLH '96 FLHR '73 125RC, Sydney Australia
Re: Clutch
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday, February 02, 2011. 04:50:06 PM. »
Hi!
a bit of digging and I have found a bit of info on the stack height - how high all the plates should be when piled on top of each other - 1.550". not sure of the tolerances on that.
BTW - aftrmarket friction plates tend to have thinner steel inners and therefore thinner 'teeth' that stick out the side, and these tend to cut into the alloy 'tongues' on the clutch hub, causing the clutch to bind up (after a lot of miles) - at least that has happened to me anyway. The OEM one is far superior IMHO.
cheers
Andy
If you can't fix it with a hammer and a roll of Duck tape then you're in trouble

Offline glenf

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Re: Clutch
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday, February 08, 2011. 06:12:15 AM. »
 Thank you for your input, I can get the stack height to 1.48 not sure if this is good or not. i did find a stock spring plate in L.A.Calif not far from me, there is a shop that is all sportsters ordered that and will go stock. This is a bike for my son to learn on,we sure picked a good one for that. 

Offline andyxlh

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  • Country: au
  • '89 XLH '96 FLHR '73 125RC, Sydney Australia
Re: Clutch
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday, February 08, 2011. 07:25:29 PM. »
Hi Glen
is that height with the spring plate removed and 2 steels and one frition plate inserted in place of it? If that is so, you could put it back together and have a go without the spring plate, less stack height will mean less pressure from the clutch spring and possible slip, it will go back together OK.
BUT you need to swap the spring plate for all three - the spring plate in the OEM clutch is adjacent to 2 friction plates, and so you need to maintain the friction/steel/friction layout. I would have thought it would have been thicker but there u go.
Remember that new friction sets for the clutches for the 4 speed evo models come up on ebay all the time, I got my last aftermarket one for about $40US. like I said they aren't as good as OEM I don't think, but whilst you have it apart it might be worth putting new frictions in too. Have a look at the grooves in the friction material, as they wear they tend to get very shallow (like a tire wearing out) but I'm not sure off the top of my head their stock depth.
You are probably aware of the 2 problems wit the early evo sportsters primary and transmissions - the magnets shedding on the back of the clutch basket, and the shifter cam breaking in the transmission. If you have it apart it might be worth replacing the cam with a steel aftermarket one, and checking the condition of the splines on the clutch shaft and hub as well as the magnets for looseness on the back of the clutch basket.
I have a few pics of this on my website i did a few years ago, should link from this site.
cheers
Andy
Sydney
If you can't fix it with a hammer and a roll of Duck tape then you're in trouble

Offline glenf

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Re: Clutch
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday, February 09, 2011. 07:15:08 AM. »
Andy, yes we went in the transmission and replaced everthing all the way out. As I said the kid is learning a lot on this one, we will do the top end also after that he can do all of his work and let me ride at least I am hopeful. Right now he takes one of my bikes on long trips but I told him if he did not get this fixed he could not use my bike at all, sure got him moving. Which part are you in over there flood, fire or cyclone?  Thank you for the help. Glen

Offline andyxlh

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  • Country: au
  • '89 XLH '96 FLHR '73 125RC, Sydney Australia
Re: Clutch
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday, February 09, 2011. 04:22:16 PM. »
Hello mate
yes I have done that on mine in the last few years. The trick is getting the end play on the shafts correct so they select nice and smooth.
If he is going to use it for long trips, I suggest upping the gearing to a 22 or better still a 23 tooth front sprocket. You loose a little off the stoplight but gain legs up high.
I'm in Sydney which is not in any of them! Just another sunny day in paradise here....
cheers
Andy
If you can't fix it with a hammer and a roll of Duck tape then you're in trouble